New Nanotechnology Applications for Architecture: Liquid Repelling Coating (Video)

Image: Kevin Krejci | Flickr

A new nanotechnology application has emerged where a special hydrophobic and oleophobic coating can be applied to almost any surface — and then that surface repels liquids like water and oil while also preventing rust, dirt, ice or grease from affecting the material’s surface. As you can imagine, nanotechnology applications emerge where within buildings such a coating can be applied to flooring, stairs, and rails to prevent slipping.

Other uses emerge for this coating as well. Just imagine protecting technologies that sit outside from natural elements like rain. The coating also helps to prevent corrosion, and it is even good for more sterile environments because it helps to prevent bacteria on treated surfaces. All in all, this nanotechnology coating can help buildings to be maintained, where their materials last longer.

So, what does this all mean?

Safer, Cleaner, and Longer Lasting Buildings?

There are a couple of examples where the use of such a nanotechnology coating still leaves questions to be answered. For example, this coating could help to keep building windows cleaner — but the coating is not made in a translucent “color” just yet. Also, what if this coating was applied to building materials, and then they caught fire. Could the fire be put out if such materials repelled liquid?

Of course, concrete coating in this nano material would stay cleaner longer — as it repels debris.

And this is only the beginning.

How might this coating impact the way buildings get perceived?

Well, building elements would behave a bit differently than expected. For starters, building materials would most always be dry. They would also be cleaner, and they would stay looking and feeling newer for longer. Plus, when it rained — the water would be repelled from the building, slipping right off. Walking within the building would prove to be safer, where shoe soles would grip the flooring materials that had been coated.

But enough of me writing about how it might look and feel to see materials coated with this special nanotechnology advancement — have a look for yourself, by watching the following video. And as you watch, can you think of any other applications for which a hydrophobic coating would be good?

Can’t See Video? Click Here.

Now, that you have seen this special nanotechnology coating in action, what are your reactions? Do you think there are uses for such an innovation within buildings? And remember, repelling liquids is great, but there are times when you may want liquid to work on a material. So, it is important to be selective about where you use such a coating. The benefits must outweigh any risks.

Print Friendly
Get my book and report series.
Free.
Gain access to my book Bringing Architecture to the Next Level, and learn from my 6-part Report Series. Also, get exclusive access to the Design Insight Newsletter: Expand the way you think about architectural design to reach breakthrough ideas.
Register Today
See resources below:
What you get.

Join over 9,500 members.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *